Thoughts from a Dad whose daughter is a Missionary

Thoughts from a Dad whose daughter is a Missionary

by David Boiles, father of Executive Director Jamie Boiles Cassy (Marketing and Development Director, Belay Global) asked me to write a few of my thoughts for Father’s Day and what it’s like having a daughter who lives over 8000 miles away from home. Most of you know Jamie is our youngest daughter.  As a small child, she had a big heart.  We watched her as she made friends with kids at the skating rink, at church, or wherever she went.  As she grew, so did her friendships, with schoolmates, softball teammates, the church youth group, and church camp friends. One day about 8 years ago, she came and talked with her mother and me about going on a mission trip.  Her older sister, Jennifer, had already been on several mission trips while she was at OC, so we were a little familiar with short-term mission trips and weren’t totally surprised. Jamie said she wanted to go to Rwanda. My first thoughts were, “Isn’t that the place where a million people were killed?”  She said yes.  “And you want to go there?”  Again, she said yes.  It was only going to be for 2 weeks.  So, she raised the funds to go and left for 2 weeks. The following year she wanted to go back for a 6-week visit. She got a bug.  Not a sickness bug, but a love bug for the people and the children of Rwanda. She was hooked. She began to think about going over for a 3-year commitment. With her job (in a non-profit) she had the potential and goal of becoming the program director,...
We have 30 days to close the gap

We have 30 days to close the gap

When we empower women, things change. Life happens. We get it. But we KNOW when we empower women, things change. We lost some monthly gifts due to life circumstances of previously committed donor partners, so we need to close the gap in our budget. Our current deficit is $12,000 and we need YOU to “umuganda,” which translates to “coming together.” Will you please make a one-time or recurring gift and help us close the gap? Belay Global lives out its mission in Rwanda by empowering women and seeing things change. Our DuHope program has change Josphine’s life and continues to make a daily impact on her. Will you consider helping us empower Rwandan women to overcome their many challenges? It is urgent we make up this difference and continue to provide meals, on-site childcare, literacy training, spiritual development, job training, and more. Also, as Rwanda is in a season of reflection of the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi we need to provide more counseling to our women. These women are mothers and post-genocide survivors that have had to sacrifice everything to provide for their families. In the past, they have sold themselves and struggled to provide food for their children. With the help of our donors, we have been able to equip them with ways to provide for themselves and their families with dignity. We need you to walk alongside them in faith, hope, love, and dignity. We need YOUR HELP to continue moving forward. We need you to invest monthly to make a profound impact on these women’s lives. WAYS TO HELP: Recurring monthly gifts One-time gifts Prayer...
The Time of Remembrance

The Time of Remembrance

by Jamie Boiles, Executive Director Belay Global I had requested for Marlene, our Spiritual Coordinator, to plan an event for our Belay and DuHope people to come together to commemorate the 1994 Genocide Memorial Against the Tutsis. Her plan was to visit the Genocide Memorial that was built in 2004, 10 years after the genocide. The Memorial was established for Rwandans to visit their loved ones who have been laid to rest on the grounds there and for people to learn about what happened so that it may never happen again. As a guest in this country, this time of year is hard to know what to do. Marlene said that we should visit the memorial because many of our DuHope women had never been. We loaded in cars, laughing and smiling, but as soon as we get into the parking lot, the emotions changed. Solemn. Quiet. Still. We waited to begin our tour. The tour guides kept speaking in English to accommodate myself and Betsie, the other American on our team, but we insisted that this is for the women, so they need to speak in Kinyarwanda. The memorial starts with an introduction video and I noticed tears were beginning to fall from some faces. I wondered where they were in 1994 and how they were impacted. Based on their age, we know many of them were survivors, but that is not something you ask someone. We walked through the tunnel, lined with pictures and words, describing the colonization division of the country of Rwanda and the propaganda that led up to the devastation of people killing other...
New Friends

New Friends

by Jamie Boiles, Executive Director At the end of 2016, the Belay Global Board and I had decided that we needed to hire a US-based Marketing and Development Director. The work in Rwanda has grown so much in the last few years that the 6-8 week fundraising blasts I had done in the past to keep things going wasn’t going to cover our bills any more. At this time I was wearing multiple hats, Executive Director of Belay Global, Country Director of Belay Rwanda, Managing Director of DuHope and the sole development staff. That’s a lot of hats. We set a goal of raising enough funds to hire a US-based staff person so that the weight of being the sole fundraiser would be lifted from my plate. I committed to spend 6 months in the US raising funds and looking for partners to assist with our mission either through expertise or resources. I pretty much opened a map and considered where I would want to be based. I considered community, cheap (read: free) housing, and potential for resource development. As a Sooner-born, Sooner-bred girl, there was so much irony in that Austin, Texas kept coming up in different ways and it had all of my qualifications. One of the things on my list to accomplish was to find a leather shop, or someone who works with leather and get some advice about our DuHope jewelry. I wanted to increase the quality of what the women were producing and give them more skills. I found a couple of places, but left with no leads. One day, I walked into Tandy...
Investing in Hope

Investing in Hope

by: Marlene Mumukunde, Ministry Leader What would you do if you didn’t have food for your four-year old child? No milk to give them; nothing to calm your child’s hunger. What if your child was sick and you could not afford to get them the medical attention they need?  What if your spouse struggled with addition because of continuous failure to fulfill their duties and was funneling down a downward spiral. What if your children had to watch their dad go into a nightly rage because he is turning to addition to try and numb the pain of life. What if your boyfriend who is the father of your future child promised you food and shelter, but instead you find yourself a prisoner at his mercy. I could go on with heartbreaking stories of what most consider a worst nightmares. These scenarios are the life and some of the challenges our women of DuHope face. Raised in broken families or orphans rejected by families, marginalized by society, dismissed by their husbands and boyfriends. These women are post-genocide survivors that no one every invested in and left to fail at life. These are women who found themselves in prostitution not by choice, but to escape the hunger. Our mission at DuHope is “give hope.” We endeavor each day to shine a light in the darkened lives of those women because we believe in them and we believe in the God who can transform lives. DuHope created a safe and holistic environment for women to exit sex work while walking alongside of them in faith, hope, love, and dignity. In the...